Monday, June 5, 2017

This trick makes moving iPhone apps easier than ever

If you have lots of pages of apps on your iPhone, it can be a pain to move them around. But we have an easy solution.

Rearranging apps on your iPhone and iPad is pretty easy, but moving them across screens can be a little more frustrating. There's an easy trick that solves this: use the dock.

Here's how it works. If you have multiple pages of apps on your home screen, scroll all the way right to the last page. Once there, press and hold on any app to activate "jiggle mode" — be careful not to accidentally trigger 3D Touch if you're on an iPhone 6S or later. "Jiggle mode" lets you rearrange apps on your iPhone.

Next, remove one of the apps from the dock and place it on that last page temporarily. This frees up a space the dock to shuttle apps back-and-forth to other pages on your home screen. To do this, drag the app you're relocating down to the dock. Scroll to the spot you want to put it. Then, drag it to its new spot. Repeat if necessary.

When you're all done, return the app you took off the dock back to its place and press the home button to lock everything down.

Now you can rest easy since all your apps are where you want them -- or you could finally get around to cleaning the camera on the back.

See the complete article and video at www.cnet.com/how-to/rearrange-iphone-ios-apps-easy-with-this-trick/.

Friday, April 21, 2017

15 words you should eliminate from your vocabulary to sound smarter


Newsprint is on life support, emoji are multiplying faster than hungry Gremlins, and 300 million people worldwide strive to make their point in 140 or fewer characters.

People don't have the time or the attention span to read any more words than necessary. You want your readers to hear you out, understand your message, and perhaps be entertained, right? Here's a list of words to eliminate to help you write more succinctly.
  1. That
  2. Went
  3. Honestly
  4. Absolutely
  5. Very
  6. Really
  7. Amazing
  8. Always
  9. Never
  10. Literally
  11. Just
  12. Maybe
  13. Stuff
  14. Things
  15. Irregardless
Be sure to read Jennie Haskamp's complete article at http://mashable.com/2015/05/03/words-eliminate-vocabulary/ to see why these words should be eliminated.

I'd like to add another to her list: So. When did we start  beginning sentences with the word "So"?

Monday, March 6, 2017

Studies Say Handwriting Will Make You (and Your Kids) Smarter

Choosing a pen over a keyboard does wonders for your memory.

 
Handwriting is quickly becoming a dying art. Few businesses can run nowadays without computers, giving keyboard shortcuts an unprecedented importance. Elementary and high schools across the country now view typing courses as essential to their curricula. But what are we losing as handwriting loses its significance in society?

Brain power, according to science. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California, Los Angeles conducted a series of studies to demonstrate the differences between students who wrote out their notes and those who typed notes. Participants took notes on a lecture using one of the two methods and were tested on the material 30 minutes after the lecture and again a week later. The results showed that both types of notetakers did well on the first test, though longhand notetakers had a stronger grasp of the overall concept, but students with handwritten notes were able to remember and still understand the concepts of the lecture after a week had passed. These participants were also more open to understanding new ideas.

Read Clair Nowak's complete article at http://www.rd.com/advice/parenting/why-handwriting-makes-you-smarter/.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Your TV is probably tracking you -- here's how to stop it

Internet-connected smart TVs and streaming devices from Vizio, LG, Samsung, Sony, Roku, Google and others can all spy on your viewing habits. Here's how to stop them.


When you unpacked your new TV or streamer for the first time, you probably couldn't wait to start watching it. In the excitement to put it through its paces, chances are you just clicked "I agree" to all those screens of legal mumbo jumbo that came up during the setup process.

Did you know one of the things you likely agreed to was allowing your TV to track your viewing habits and send the information to advertisers and other third parties? The same could go for your streaming device.

Vizio was recently slapped with a $2.2 million fine by the FTC for failing to properly disclose how it shares its tracking information, and in previous years Samsung and LG have both faced similar scrutiny. Streamers from Roku, Apple, Amazon and Google haven't made any major privacy missteps yet, but their policies are generally less intrusive than those of TVs.

What kind of data do TVs and streamers collect? Information about what you watch, which apps you use and other activity on your smart TV or streamer is valuable to advertisers and other third parties, as well as the manufacturers themselves. They use it to target ads and fine-tune viewing suggestions, among other things. Of course, similar usage data is also collected by phones, PCs and other devices, as well as many apps you use and web pages you visit.

Now that you know your TV or streamer could be tracking you, perhaps you want to go back and turn that tracking off.

Read David Katzmaier's article at https://www.cnet.com/how-to/your-tv-is-probably-tracking-you-heres-how-to-stop-it/ to learn how.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Pavegen plans to power the world with footsteps


UK startup Pavegen plans to take its ingenious technology, which turns the kinetic energy from footsteps into electricity, and apply it to many other areas beyond the sidewalk. Mike Butcher visited their London headquarters to learn more about where it’s currently installed and the future of using footsteps as a source of power.

Watch the video and see Mike Butcher's article at https://techcrunch.com/video/pavegen-plans-to-power-the-world-with-footsteps/5882773acb65d31e4787016c/.

Monday, October 10, 2016

Want to Prevent Heart Attack and Stroke? Laugh, Eat Chocolate and Floss


Vascular disease may be hiding in the walls of your arteries. Many people do not know they have plaque in their arteries until it is too late.  Fifty percent of people who die from a heart attack had no idea they had vascular disease.

The standard of care for cardiovascular disease prevention is based on a risk factor model rather than a disease treatment model.  The standard of care uses a formula based approach that looks at risk factors such as age, gender, cholesterol, blood pressure and smoking status and places each person in a risk category, assigning a percentage of heart attack risk over a 10-year period. It is kind of like a gamble – a best-guess scenario.

Read about Bradley Bale and Amy Doneen’s different approach at http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/health-answers/lauging-chocolate-flossing-tips-for-preventing-heart-attack-and-stroke/.

Mashable retracts recommendation of the Samsung Galaxy Note7


Due to ongoing concerns about safety, Mashable is retracting its recommendation of the Samsung Galaxy Note7 and revoking its Mashable Choice award.

We do not take this action lightly, but what's happened to the Samsung Galaxy Note7 in the last six weeks is unprecedented in mobile. After Samsung released the high-end phone to generally great reviews, including Mashable's, multiple reports began to surface that the phones were spontaneously catching fire due to exploding batteries.

It quickly became clear there was some kind of defect in how the phone's battery was made, which caused a significant (although statistically small) number of Note7 devices to malfunction. Lithium-ion batteries — the type of battery in the vast majority of today's portable consumer electronics — can become dangerously volatile if they're damaged or defective.

Samsung appeared to identify the flaw in its manufacturing process and correct it. It then began shipping "safe" Galaxy Note7 phones to customers.

That's when events went from unfortunate to unthinkable. It now appears multiple replacement Galaxy Note7's have caught fire. The developments have led to wireless carriers in the U.S. and other countries to halt sales of the device. Even Samsung is reportedly halting production of the Note7, which the company did not deny in a statement.

Those same developments have led Mashable to do something it's never done before: In light of the continued safety concerns that Samsung has yet to fully explain, Mashable can no longer recommend the Samsung Galaxy Note7, and we are rescinding the product's Mashable Choice status. Further, we echo the words of our senior editor, Stan Schroeder: Don't buy this phone.

Read Pete Pachal’s complete article at http://mashable.com/2016/10/10/do-not-buy-samsung-galaxy-note7/.